Amazon does this curious thing now, where they recommend you books based on the previous ones you’ve bought. It is akin to user personal data tracking, but you can’t do anything about it. All I can tell you is either their algorithm is flawed that it recommended for me a political satire. Or it is so perfectly advanced, that it knew I would be moved by reading 1984 and Animal Farm, both by the English author George Orwell.

When I started reading 1984, I was free of any prejudices, which is why I believe it works for everyone. The book was written in 1949, and tells how the world would look like in the year 1984, when the government would have autonomy over your life, the market, the economy, the food you ate, the activities you did and who were your friends. ‘Big Brother‘ would always be watching and listening through the telescreen which could also transmit signals about the person in whose house it was installed. History could be changed at an instant, the party was the only thing in power. And, people who indulged in thoughtcrime-logical thinking, questing the acts of the govt, even thinking bad of the party, could be vaporized into thin air.

Our protagonist, Winston Smith, lives alone and works in the Ministry of Truth (technically for covering up lies), realises that the party changes its stance numerous times and wants a revolution to happen. He needs to find like minded people who can stir up a revolution and free the people from such an oppressive rule. He meets Julia, a young girl and confides in her, and the story proceeds to show how they attempt to execute their plans and its consequences.

It is a dystopian novel, and Orwell’s writing style is so simple and straightforward that you are bound to read it from page to page.The story progresses in such a manner that you are introduced to the protagonist, the party and then the events of thought-crime that Winston does in thinking to rise against the party. It is a perfect book on what is happening in the world today in some part. Even Trump’s rule has been likened to the party leaders from 1984. Just a taste of what is to come.

It is not overly political that you can’t read it. And it is gripping from start to end. I wouldn’t spoil the ending for any of you, but any of te various plotlines would have worked for the main character. Because the winner is the story and the lessons that it is trying to teach us.

The conclusion? It is worth all the hype because it is contemporary and universal all at the same time. If a science student can love it, so can anyone else.

Storyline: 4/5

Simplicity of thoughts: 4/5

Writing style: 3.5/5

Politically Correct: Not at all, which is why you’ll love it!

 

Next Review: Animal Farm, by George Orwell

Last Review: The Hypnotist, by Lars Kepler

 

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